Category Archives: Partner News

2017 Creative Youth Development Webinar Series

We’re producing a year-long webinar series designed to increase understanding of CYD practice, build capacity, and advance the field.

The first three webinars are focused on CYD fundamentals. In the months ahead, we’ll be adding to this exciting line-up with deeper dives into the five imperatives of the CYD national policy agenda, including webinars on cross-sector collaboration, documenting and communicating impact, promoting youth leadership, and more.

Creative Youth Development: What’s in a Name?       
Wednesday, April 5, 1 – 2:30pm ET
Register for this free webinar presented by the National Guild for Community Arts Education

Creative Youth Development (CYD) intentionally integrates learning in the arts, humanities, and sciences with youth development principles. In CYD programs, young people create work and apply their creative skills to solve problems, shape their lives and build the world in which they want to live. The 2014 National Summit for CYD generated new focus and energy in CYD, catalyzing collective action (e.g., CYD National Partnership, Alliance for Creative Youth Development). Through case study examples, discussion, and student work, we’ll explore what it means to create and sustain programs for youth through this framework.

Presenters:
Nicole Amri, Program Director, Say Si, San Antonio, TX
Karen LaShelle, Executive Director, Creative Action, Austin, TX
Denise Montgomery, Director, Creative Youth Development National Initiative
Youth Artists from Creative Action and Say Si

Five Effective Models of Creative Youth Development Practice       
Monday, April 24, 1 – 2:30pm ET
Register for this free webinar presented by the National Guild for Community Arts Education

In this dynamic “TED Talk-style” webinar, representatives of five exemplary creative youth development organizations will share how their programs are sparking young people’s creativity and building critical learning and life skills that carry into adulthood. Through short-form, energetic presentations by A Reason to Survive, Community MusicWorks, DAVA, Destiny Arts Center, and Harmony Project, you’ll learn about several, interrelated CYD practices including:

  • Integrating youth voice and leadership into core organizational structures and programs
  • Creating opportunities for young people to create a more just and equitable society
  • Establishing young people as key leaders in community development efforts
  • Preparing young people for transitions into college and careers
  • Supporting young people holistically

This showcase will send provide you and your team with inspiration and new ideas for how to create, develop, and advocate for successful creative youth development programs.

Presenters:
Matt D’Arrigo, Founder & CEO, A Reason to Survive (ARTS), National City, CA
Jon Hinojosa, Artistic & Executive Director, Say Si, San Antonio, TX
Susan Jenson, Director, DAVA, Aurora, CO
Chloe Kline, Education Director, Community MusicWorks, Providence, RI
Myka Miller, Executive Director, Harmony Project, Los Angeles, CA
Rashidi Omari, Teaching Artist & Co-Director of Destiny Youth Performance Company, Destiny Arts Center, Oakland, CA
Program Alumni

Youth Development in the Arts, Sciences, and Humanities       
Thursday, April 27, 4 – 5:30pm ET
Register for this free webinar presented by Massachusetts Cultural Council

This webinar is designed to increase the knowledge of a youth development approach as it applies to quality arts learning using examples, theory, and frameworks for integrating youth development practice into arts programs. The webinar will provide a definition of positive youth outcomes and the youth development approach in addition to examining levels of youth participation in arts, science, and humanities based programs. Finally, the webinar will provide an introduction to the Boston Youth Arts Evaluation Project framework for designing, evaluating, and reflecting on youth development as an essential component of high quality creative youth development programming.

Presenters:
Eryn Johnson, Executive Director, Community Art Center, Cambridge, MA
Laurie Jo Wallace, Director of Training and Capacity Building, Health Resources in Action, Boston, MA

Juvenile Justice & Workforce Development Leaders Discuss CYD

Last week the Creative Youth Development National Partnership hosted a panel of cross-sector leaders at the Armory Center for the Arts in Pasadena, California to discuss creative youth development and cross-sector partnerships. Panelists included:

Cynthia Campoy Brophy, Executive Director at artworxLA and member of the National Guild for Community Arts Education’s CYD Steering Committee, moderated the discussion.

Approximately 50 CYD practitioners and stakeholders from Southern California attended the session. The purpose of the panel was for the CYD field to hear from cross-sector about their areas of focus and motivations in order to better understand how CYD might partner across sectors as well as to be inspired by the CYD cross-sector work happening in the Los Angeles region.

Sainz and Johnson shared their experiences working with and on behalf of young people facing adversity. Both leaders championed creative youth development as a powerful and effective way to connect with young people and engage them in activities and programs that can alter the fundamental trajectories of their lives.

Sainz’s efforts in workforce investment includes a focus on “recovering the 1 in 6 young people in Los Angeles aged 16-24 who are not employed or in school, currently totaling 82,000”—the opportunity youth discussed in the CYD-publication Setting the Agenda and elsewhere—as well as youth development, investing in education, and reducing recidivism. Sainz has observed that the arts support the retention of young people in programs and that the arts offerings at the LA community centers his department funds are the most popular programs among teens and young adults.

Johnson’s commitment to social justice includes reducing the incarceration footprint, reducing and redirecting money spent on corrections, and putting those funds into other systems such as education, and building mainstream support for criminal justice reform. His work on behalf of young people also includes serving as Vice President of the Los Angeles County School Board.

Johnson reflected on how “the arts allow young people to engage in a way that meets them where they are…the arts allows kids to get in touch with their feelings, whatever rage might be inside, whatever socioeconomic factors they might face.”

“Broken people become broken adults…you see hope when kids are able to let it out,” he said.

He spoke specifically about the role of creative youth development in skills development, retention, whole child pathways, and development of relationships with meaning and heart and in providing a different perspective to calcified thinking about how to work with young people, particularly those who have been incarcerated or for whom school has been an alienating or otherwise negative experience. In spotlighting the talents and hard work of young people engaged in CYD programs Johnson sees an antidote to the pervasive negative portrayals of young people in the media, particularly low-income boys and men of color.

Brazell shared information about her agency’s internship programs which include efforts to place young people who have aged out of the foster care system into internships in supportive and caring environments at community arts organizations.

The panelists shared a conviction about the need to advocate for investment in young people, and they discussed opportunities around joint advocacy. With strong consensus about the value of CYD in supporting positive outcomes and promising futures for young people, the panelists shifted into discussion of challenges to partnership, including funding, bureaucracies, and work cultures. They discussed the need to understand cross-sector partners’ language and to communicate in ways that support understanding.

With forums such as this one the Partnership aims to build understanding and dialogue about cross-sector partnership and CYD. Engaging not-the-usual-suspects leaders such as Robert Sainz and Alex Johnson in the CYD movement and providing platforms for them to speak on behalf of the value of creative youth development in the lives of young people are important strategies for extending the work of CYD across sectors and for growing support for the field.

Amplify Grants Awarded to 15 Youth-Led Community Projects

Youth Leaders with Elevated Thought in Lawrence, MAThis year, the Massachusetts Cultural Council awarded 15 Amplify grants totaling $15,000 to projects designed and executed by young people in programs receiving YouthReach or SerHacer funding. Amplify shines a spotlight on the contributions these young people make to their communities by supporting them directly in creating and publicly sharing their work.

See the Amplify projects supported in 2017 and 2016.

Apply for a National Arts and Humanities Youth Program Award

Images of NAHYP awarded programs

If your organization is offering outstanding out-of-school-time humanities learning opportunities to young people, you may be eligible for the 2017 National Arts and Humanities Youth Program Awards. See if your organization is eligible.

The National Arts and Humanities Youth Program Award is the nation’s highest honor for out-of-school arts and humanities programs that celebrate the creativity of America’s young people, particularly those from underserved communities. This award recognizes and supports excellence in programs that open new pathways to learning, self-discovery, and achievement.

How to Apply

Completed applications will only be accepted via the online process.

Application deadline has been extended Until February 13, 9:00PM PST.

The National Arts and Humanities Youth Program Awards is a signature program of the President’s Committee on the Arts and the Humanities – in partnership with the National Endowment for the Arts, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the Institute of Museum and Library Services.

CYD Partnership Appoints National Advisory Committee

The Creative Youth Development National Partnership has appointed 11 members to its National Advisory Committee. Additional advisors will be appointed in the coming months. This cross-sector Committee will play a significant strategic role in helping to shape and vet strategic recommendations for how to advance the field of CYD.

We are pleased to announce the following advisors:

  • Nicole Amri, Program Director, SAY Sí, San Antonio, TX
  • Jennifer Cole, Executive Director, Metro Arts, Nashville, TN
  • Sarah Cunningham, Executive Director of Research, School of the Arts at Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA
  • Deb Habib, Executive Director, Seeds of Solidarity, Orange, MA
  • Alex Johnson, Managing Director for Californians for Safety and Justice, Oakland, CA
  • Cristy Johnston Limon, Executive Director, Destiny Arts Center, Oakland, CA
  • Erik Peterson, Vice President, Policy, Afterschool Alliance, Washington, D.C.
  • Kwame Scruggs, Founder and Director of Programs and Training, Alchemy Inc., Akron, OH
  • Lauren Stevenson, Director of Youth Initiatives, Head of Project 1324, Adobe Social Impact, San Francisco Bay Area, CA
  • Matt Wilson, Executive Director, MASSCreative, Boston, MA
  • Jason Yoon, Executive Director, Atlas DIY, Brooklyn, NY

See full bios.

New META Fellowships Provide Professional Development for Mass Teaching Artists

Eric Booth leads learning session for more than 40 Massachusetts teaching artists on October 13, 2016 at the META Fellowship launch at Boston’s Symphony Hall.The Massachusetts Cultural Council (MCC) and Klarman Family Foundation have launched a new program to help teaching artists improve the quality of their work with youth in schools and community settings across Massachusetts.

The Music Educators and Teaching Artists (META) Fellowship Pilot Program meets a growing need for high-quality, professional teaching in programs that employ the principles of creative youth development. With an initial focus on music, this two-year fellowship will help teaching artists develop the skills, relationships, and experiences they need to improve their practice. In turn, these artist educators will be better equipped to help their students grow as musicians and develop the cognitive and life skills they will need to thrive as adults.

“This project is a game changer. It is powerful and unique in a number of ways,” says Eric Booth, author and international authority on teaching artistry. “This can serve as a model for the rest of the country.”

Read more.

CYD Partners Host Briefing in Washington, D.C.

Megan Beyer, Executive Director of The President’s Committee on the Arts and the Humanities (PCAH), welcomes attendees of the briefing organized by the CYD National Partnership and hosted by PCAH in Washington, D.C.

Megan Beyer, Executive Director of The President’s Committee on the Arts and the Humanities (PCAH), welcomes attendees of the briefing organized by the CYD National Partnership and hosted by PCAH in Washington, D.C.

Over 30 representatives from federal agencies and national organizations attended the Creative Youth Development National Partnership’s briefing on the CYD field and Partnership on September 19 in Washington, D.C. Cross-sector partnership is vital to our efforts to build access and opportunities for young people to participate in CYD programs across the country. We are grateful for the rich dialogue and the advice and information shared by briefing participants from the National Endowment for the Arts, National Endowment for the Humanities, Institute of Museum and Library Services, Afterschool Alliance, U.S. Department of Justice, and National Assembly of State Arts Agencies.

Discussion on common areas of interest ranged from community development, connected learning, exposure of youth to violence and trauma, research on breaking the school-to-prison pipeline, heightened interest in social and emotional learning, equity and social justice, pathways to higher education, and potential areas of collaboration. The Partnership will continue to forge ties across sectors as a core strategy to increasing access for young people to quality CYD programs nationwide.

Join the CYD Program Database

As part of the newly announced CYD National Partnership, programs and practitioners are encouraged to register their work in the CYD Program Database as administered by Animating Democracy. By registering in the database, you will be first to know about upcoming opportunities to engage in research, communications, and convening. Particularly, we will be issuing a field survey and call for effective practices in CYD in the coming months. Don’t miss out. Register Now.

Peer-Reviewed Journal Article Published on Rise of CYD

Arts Education Policy Review coverA new article, “The Rise of Creative Youth Development,” was recently published in the peer-reviewed journal Arts Education Policy Review (June 2016). Written by Denise Montgomery, Director of the Creative Youth Development National Initiative, this article describes core characteristics of creative youth development (CYD) programs and provides background on the origins and history of the field, including current advances and signs the field is coalescing. The article also describes CYD in the larger contexts of arts education and of education reform, and discusses policy, funding, and research needs and opportunities.

Download the article (PDF). This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Arts Education Policy Review on June 16, 2016.